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dc.contributor.advisorCottrell, Stuart P.
dc.contributor.advisorO'Leary, Joseph T.
dc.contributor.authorJimenez, Aracelis
dc.contributor.committeememberTeel, Tara L.
dc.contributor.committeememberMcShane, Kathleen
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-07T10:20:24Z
dc.date.available2021-06-07T10:20:24Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.description2021 Spring.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractResearch shows that the experiences humans have with nature during their youth and adolescence can reinforce pro-environmental values, attitudes, and behaviors in adulthood (Bruni & Schultz, 2009; Tanner, 1980). Environmental education (EE) has been used to facilitate these formative experiences, especially within outdoor adventure programs committed to educating youth on conservation issues, and developing a conservation ethic (CE) that empowers participants to engage in pro-environmental behaviors (Pitt, Schultz, & Vaske, 2019). CE refers to an environmental attitude and corresponding behavioral guide as it relates to the judicious use, allocation, and protection of natural resources, for the purpose of sustainably managing the world's ecosystems and services they provide (Callicott, 1990; Ehrlich, 2002; Robinson & Garratt, 1999). This study seeks to better understand how program design and subsequent experiences impact youth in adventure programs, specifically as it relates to the development and/or expansion of a CE in participants. This study took place at the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) Florida National Sea Base High Adventure program, and included the Marine STEM Adventure, Fishing Adventure, and Keys Adventure programs. Using on a mixed-methods approach, this research consists of observational data from participation in the Marine STEM and Out Island program(s), interview data from semi-structured interviews with scouts (n=20), and pre and post-program survey data from scouts and adult leaders (n=252). Survey data was examined with an principal factor analysis and reliability tests to reveal reliable distinctions between variables, t-tests to determine significant differences in variables before and after participant experiences, multivariate analyses that determined the relational strength of independent variables against the dependent variable CE, and use of one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to determine significant differences across the Sea Base programs surveyed. Interview data underwent a content analysis to identify themes as they relate to the survey data and analysis, with observational data offering additional context and validity of interpretation of survey results. Results revealed that self-reported program impacts (i.e. the perception that an increase in awareness and knowledge of marine environmental issues, confidence and motivation to care for natural resources, and the fulfillment of a High Adventure Sea Base experience) was the strongest site-specific variable that predicted CE and the Sea Base program could readily influence. This analysis provides insight on existing literature relating to youth adventure programs and how to operationalize lessons learned for Sea Base and similar outdoor programs. Informed by study results and previous literature, this research also makes recommendations for how to cultivate experiences that focus on deliberate use of EE and increase effectiveness of the youth adventure programs in their commitments to cultivating a CE in youth.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierJimenez_colostate_0053N_16583.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/232550
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2020- CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectenvironmental education
dc.subjectoutdoor recreation
dc.subjectyouth adventure programs
dc.subjecthuman dimensions of natural resources
dc.subjectconservation ethic
dc.subjectsocial science
dc.titleRole of youth adventure programs for shaping a conservation ethic, The
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Dimensions of Natural Resources
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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