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dc.contributor.advisorPopat, Ketul C.
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Kevin
dc.contributor.committeememberKota, Arun
dc.contributor.committeememberReynolds, Melissa
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T16:06:27Z
dc.date.available2017-09-14T16:06:27Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.description2017 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractHemocompatibility and bacterial infections cause challenges for medical devices. When any material is implanted into the body bacteria, blood, proteins and platelets will adsorb and attach to its surface. The platelet adsorption leads to thrombosis and clot formation on the surfaces, restricting blood flow and in some cases leading to inflammation and device failure. Bacteria adhesion leads to colony formation and eventually infection if left untreated. Infections can be treated with antibiotics, but growing antibiotic resistance among bacteria has spurred a search for methods that reduce infections without increasing resistance. Proposed methods have included diamond-like carbon surfaces, drug-eluting surfaces, and titania nanotube arrays. These methods have all shown some initial improved, but no approach has proven durable over long periods of time. Superhemophobic surfaces are a new approach to improving performance of medical devices, but the interactions of blood components and bacteria with these surfaces have not been well-documented. In this work, superhemophobic surfaces were developed by modifying the surface topography and surface chemistry of titanium. The surface topography was modified by creating titania nanotube arrays through a well-documented anodization and chemical etching technique. Superhemophobicity was induced by modifying the titania nanotube arrays with different silanes using chemical vapor deposition. The investigations of blood interactions with superhemophobic surfaces showed reduced protein adsorption. The bacteria adhesion studies showed reduced attachment for both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results indicate these surfaces have potential for enhancing material hemocompatibility and reducing the attachment of bacteria.
dc.format.mediumborn digital
dc.format.mediummasters theses
dc.identifierBartlett_colostate_0053N_14395.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10217/184020
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectblood
dc.subjectnanotube
dc.subjecttitanium
dc.subjecthemocompatibility
dc.subjectbacteria
dc.subjectsuperhydrophobic
dc.titleSuperhydrophobic titania nanotube arrays for reducing adhesion of bacteria and platelets
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this Item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)


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