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dc.date.accessioned2017-01-05T17:21:13Z
dc.date.available2017-01-05T17:21:13Z
dc.date.submitted2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/178977
dc.description2016 Fall
dc.descriptionColorado State University Art and Art History Department capstone project
dc.descriptionCapstone contains the artist's statement, a list of works, and images of works
dc.description.abstractThe artist's statement: My pottery centers on the natural world. The scientific aspects of plants and animals, like ecology, biology, and taxonomy, fascinate and inspire me. At the same time, I am influenced by tableware of many kinds, from historic Chinese cobalt-on-white vessels to a 30-dollar teapot you can pick up at a tea shop. My simple tableware forms combine the aesthetic of a china cabinet with that of flea market handmade pottery. White glazes and plant motifs reference delicate porcelain, but thicker walls and rugged qualities of stoneware give the pieces a more durable feel. The process of using handmade pots is important to me, and I consider the usage of each pot carefully. In brewing tea, for example, there is steeping, pouring, and drinking. I form each pot so that these steps may be executed with ease, without trouble from, say, an insecure lid or uncomfortable cup lip. Similarly, making pots consists of distinct steps – throwing, trimming, decorating, firing. As I perform these steps, I consider how my choices affect the steps in using the finished pot. A wide, sharp lip on a honey pot catches drips, and a white glaze on tea ware reveals the color of the tea and makes it easy to tell when it's done brewing. I combine teapots and cups with plant imagery to create tableware that is both functional and aesthetically pleasing. Sometimes, the plants are specific species, which can spark an interesting and educational conversation about plant identification. These pots mix aspects of botanical illustration with floral decorative tableware – a union of science and art. I simply seek to make pottery that anyone would want in their kitchen; I want my pots to be aesthetically pleasing but ultimately useful, so they will have a purpose in someone's home.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectPottery
dc.titleLauren Domnik : capstone
dc.title.alternativeTree Pots
dc.typeStudent Work
dc.typeArt
thesis.degree.nameCapstone
thesis.degree.levelUndergraduate
thesis.degree.disciplineArt and Art History
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
dc.contributor.artistDomnik, Lauren


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