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dc.contributor.authorCook, C. Wayne
dc.coverage.spatialColorado
dc.coverage.temporal1978-06-01-1979-05-31
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T18:43:30Z
dc.date.available2016-03-08T18:43:30Z
dc.date.issued1979
dc.descriptionC. Wayne Cook, principal investigator.
dc.descriptionPrepared for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract no. EY-76-S-02-4018.
dc.descriptionSubmitted March 1979.
dc.descriptionC00-4018-3.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description.abstractThe following document is a third-year progress report to the original contract [Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4018] for the period June 1, 1978 to May 31, 1979. The overall objective of the project is to study the effects of seeding techniques, species mixtures, fertilizer, ecotypes, improved plant materials, mycorrhizal fungi, and soil microorganisms on the initial and final stages of reclamation obtained through seeding and subsequent succession on disturbed oil shale lands. Plant growth medias that are being used in field-established test plots include retorted shale, soil over retorted shale, subsoil materials, and surface disturbed topsoils. Because of the long-term nature of successional and ecologically oriented studies the project is just beginning to generate significant publications. Several of the studies associated with the project have some phases being conducted principally in the laboratories and greenhouses at Colorado State University. The majority of the research, however, is being conducted on a 20 hectare Intensive Study Site located near the focal points of oil shale activity in the Piceance Basin. The site is at an elevation of 2,042 m, receives approximately 30 to 55 cm of precipitation annually, and encompasses the plant communities most typical of the Piceance Basin. Most of the information contained in this report originated from the monitoring and sampling of research plots established in either the fall of 1976 or 1977. Therefore, data that have been obtained from the Intensive Study Site represent only first- or second-year results. However, many trends have been identified in the successional process and the soil microorganisms and mycorrhizal studies continue to contribute significant information to the overall results. The phytosociological study has progressed to a point where field sampling is complete and the application and publication of this material will be forth coming in 1979. The plant selection and ecotype studies have made substantial progress, but because of the nature of the research publishable information is not yet available.
dc.format.mediumreports
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/170943
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.publisher.originalColorado State University
dc.relation.ispartofPiceance Intensive Study
dc.subject.lcshRevegetation -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshReclamation of land -- Colorado
dc.subject.lcshOil-shale industry -- Environmental aspects -- Colorado
dc.titleRehabilitation potential and practices of Colorado oil shale lands: progress report for period June 1, 1978 - May 31, 1979
dc.typeText


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