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dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Thomas H.
dc.contributor.authorSyed, Zaker Ali
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-28T14:35:46Z
dc.date.available2015-08-28T14:35:46Z
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifierSyed_colostate_0053N_13236.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/167250
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.
dc.description2015 Summer
dc.description.abstractConstruction of buildings is one of the major sources of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and energy consumption. It would therefore be beneficial to improve the design of new buildings so that they consume less energy and reduce GHG emissions over their lifecycle. However, the design of these “green buildings” is challenging because the analyses required to design and optimize these buildings is time intensive and complicated. In response, numerous software applications have been developed over the years by various government agencies, organizations and researchers. But, recent surveys of architects have found that these energy simulation programs are used irregularly and by very few architectural firms. The utility of these programs is limited by three main factors. First, these software applications are complicated, stand-alone programs that require extensive training to be effective. Second, there are a large set of energy simulation programs available, all of which have differing metrics of building performance with differing degrees of accuracy. And lastly, these applications do not fit into the conventional workflow that architects follow for a majority of projects. To address these issues, this thesis focuses on the development of a simplified HVAC model that not only gives sufficiently accurate results but also can be easily integrated into the conventional design workflow. There are some key challenges in developing such a model. • Early in the design process (when many irreversible energy impacting design decisions are made) there is very limited information available about the building materials, heat loads, and more. • The simulation must be integrated into the design software and workflows that are currently being used by architects. This requires a near-instantaneous calculation method that can extract information from the only available data at the initial design (sketching) phase, the computer aided design (CAD) models and the location. To achieve these objectives, the Radiant Time Series (RTS) method was supplemented with real data from National Solar Radiation Database to enable a near-instantaneous annual HVAC load calculation to be integrated into preliminary CAD modelling software. This model was integrated in to the Trimble Sketch-up™ software. The combined software system is demonstrated to enable effective design feedback in early design decisions including building orientation, construction material and design of fenestration.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectHVAC
dc.subjectGreen Building Design
dc.titleReal-time building HVAC model implemented as a tool for decision making in early stages of design, A
dc.typeThesis
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Charles
dc.contributor.committeememberSampath, Walajabad
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (M.S.)
thesis.degree.levelMasters
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University


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