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dc.contributor.advisorGilley, Jerry W.
dc.contributor.authorShelton, Paul M.
dc.contributor.committeememberFolkestad, James E.
dc.contributor.committeememberRademacher, Robert A.
dc.contributor.committeememberMakela, Carole J.
dc.contributor.committeememberVenneberg, Donald L.
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T06:32:54Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T06:32:54Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.descriptionDepartment Head: Timothy Gray Davies.
dc.description2008 Summer.
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 76-81).
dc.description.abstractThis quantitative study analyzed group potency in graduate learning communities. Group potency is the collective belief that a group can succeed, achieve, and be effective in its endeavor. The study addressed these relationships -- group potency and (a) participants’ perception of organizational support, (b) length of time participants have been together, and (c) size of the learning community, and size of the learning community and the perception of organizational support. The study used a three part questionnaire. The first section identified levels of perceived organizational support and was developed by Eisenberger. The second section measured group potency as developed from Shea and Guzzo. Finally, the third part asked for demographic data. There were 192 participants from four universities' graduate school cohorts who responded to an electronically distributed questionnaire. The findings were analyzed using Pearson's r and ANOVAs to identify relationships between the variables or differences among groups. Respondents were between the ages of 31 and 50 years (60.2%). Females accounted for 69.3% of the sample. All respondents were completing or had completed either a master’s degree or doctoral degree in business, education, human resources, or organizational development as identified by the participants, not the programs' designation. The findings suggest that there is a significant relationship between group potency and perceived organizational support. However, there were no significant relationships between length of time of membership and group potency, group size and group potency levels, and group size and levels of perceived organizational support. The implications for practice are that in graduate school cohorts, group potency can be increased by increasing students' perception that the organization supports it.
dc.format.mediumdoctoral dissertations
dc.identifier2008_summer_Shelton.pdf
dc.identifierETDF2008100003EDUC
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10217/11677
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherColorado State University. Libraries
dc.relationCatalog record number (MMS ID): 991009869989703361
dc.relationLB2371.S547 2008
dc.relation.ispartof2000-2019 - CSU Theses and Dissertations
dc.rightsCopyright of the original work is retained by the author.
dc.subjectgroup potency
dc.subjectgraduate learning communities
dc.subjectorganizational support
dc.subject.lcshOrganizational learning
dc.subject.lcshUniversities and colleges -- Graduate work -- Social aspects
dc.subject.lcshCommunities of practice
dc.titleGroup potency in graduate learning communities: organizational support, group size, and duration of membership
dc.typeText
dcterms.rights.dplaThe copyright and related rights status of this item has not been evaluated (https://rightsstatements.org/vocab/CNE/1.0/). Please refer to the organization that has made the Item available for more information.
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation
thesis.degree.grantorColorado State University
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)


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